Forests & Woodlands

The climate changes expected over the next century will have huge consequences for ecosystems and the benefits they provide, including the provision of wood and fuel, food, temperature and flood regulation, erosion control, recreational and aesthetic value, and species habitat, among others.

Climate changes are likely to affect important ecological processes that will, in turn, affect key natural resources. For example, temperature and precipitation changes could mean that insectswildfireinvasive plants, and forest diseases will become more frequent in some areas of the country. The emissions that cause climate change also lead to air quality problems that put additional stress on trees.

 

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Riparian forest buffers in Pennsylvania

Many people advise that while the best time to plant a tree was 20 years ago, the second best time to plant a tree is today. Winter weather makes it tough to follow this advice, but the off-season does provide a bit more time to plan ahead for the year to come. Extreme rain...

Planning for Planting

autumn road view

“Low-volume” roads are roads with traffic volumes generally less than 400 vehicles per day. Across New England these roads provide a critical transportation link for rural communities and commerce. They also provide access to forests for logging and other forest management...

The Future of Winter Roads

The economic, social, and environmental costs of drought can be significant, and vulnerability to drought in arid and semi-arid regions will likely increase in the future with a warming climate. To promote stronger drought resilience on federal lands, the National Drought...

Responding to Ecological Drought in the Intermountain Region

The U.S. Forest Service and USDA Climate Hubs convened regional workshops in many of the nine Forest Service regions throughout 2017. The workshops helped develop a set of local strategies and tactics to reduce, mitigate, and, in some cases, recover from the effects of drought. ...

Dealing with Drought in Forests, Grasslands, and Rangelands

A changing climate is already being felt in the pocketbook. Whether these are direct, weather-related crop losses or new sources of income, weather and climate have a direct economic impact on Northeast producers. Many are looking at long- and short-term strategies to improve...

Economics of Climate Change

A newly constructed stream simulation culvert on the George Washington National Forest.

Extreme Precipitation and Trends There is clear evidence that precipitation in the Northeast is more intense than it was in the past. The increase in the Northeast has been greater than any other region in the U.S. (Figure 1). Between 1901 and 2014, total annual precipitation...

Storms and Stream-Crossings

Stand of birch trees in the northwoods

Climate trends in northern Minnesota point to a future that will be warmer and more variable, presenting greater stress for boreal species such as paper birch, white spruce, and balsam fir. Early public feedback on the proposed North Shore Forest Restoration Project indicated...

Superior National Forest: North Shore Forest Restoration Project

Caroline Lake, Wisconsin

Project partners identified a number of potential adaptation actions with the overarching intent to maintain the resilience of the forest to changing conditions. In the northern hardwood forest, actions to maintain and enhance tree species diversity were prescribed to reduce the...

The Nature Conservancy: Caroline Lake Preserve

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