Coastal

The coastal US is at the forefront of many climate change induced stressors. Sea level rise, saltwater intrusion, coastal subsidence, and coastal erosion create a feedback cycle that leads to land loss and diminished freshwater resources for agricultural and forest systems, as well as increased vulnerability to storm events. Coastal subsidence, primarily caused by an increase in groundwater demand and the subsequent reduction in the groundwater table, is exacerbated by rising seas. As the lens of saltwater pushes farther into above the brackish and fresh groundwater table, forested systems accustomed to less saline water die, allowing more coastline to be lost to marshland and erosion. Additionally, drought frequency and duration are projected to intensify in some coastal areas, and could exacerbate these impacts. Planting more salt tolerant crops and more wind resistant trees can partially mitigate some impacts, though certain lands will likely undergo permanent ecosystem change. The changes in ecosystem type will become more likely and widespread over time.

Increased sea surface temperatures are expected to lead to less frequent but more intense (i.e., more Category 4 and 5) hurricanes. These storms can damage crops, livestock, plantation and natural forest systems through excessive precipitation, high winds, and storm surges. Where saltwater intrusion is also present, coastal forests may have difficulty recovering after a major storm.

Extreme Precipitation and Trends There is clear evidence that precipitation in the Northeast is more intense than it was in the past. The increase in the Northeast has been greater than any other region in the U.S. (Figure 1). Between 1901 and 2014, total annual precipitation…

Taking action now can help forested watersheds prepare for and adapt to a changing climate. Forested watersheds improve water quality and enhance water storage, naturally regulate streamflows, reduce flood damages and stormwater runoff, replenish groundwater and provide a myriad…

Traditional and indigenous knowledge and perspectives have not often been recognized in climate adaptation planning efforts focused on natural resources. The Northern Forests Climate Hub is collaborating with regional tribal partners to address this gap, and collaborating to…

Dibaginjigaadeg Anishinaabe Ezhitwaad - A Tribal Climate Adaptation Menu and resources.   Climate change has impacted and will continue to impact indigenous peoples, their lifeways and culture, and the natural world upon which they rely, in unpredictable and potentially…

A project designed to build a virtual consortium of Masters and Doctoral students working on climate adaptation in agriculture and forestry. Nominated by a university partner within the USDA Northeast Climate Hub network, GradCAP scholars work with Climate Hub leadership,…

Sea levels are rising, and storm intensity and rainfall are projected to increase as the climate continues to warm. In 2012, Hurricane Sandy showed the state of New Jersey the power of storms that climate change is predicted to bring to the Northeast coast. Researchers are…