Management Actions

As working lands continue to respond to the pressures of a changing climate, individuals and organizations tasked with managing these systems will benefit from reexamining their priorities, objectives, and tactics. Some land managers may ultimately decide not to make any near-term changes in priorities or tactics, even after considering climate pressures on the lands they manage. Others may choose to accommodate change even as they attempt to ensure continued value from the lands in question. In other words, as forests, rangelands, and other systems adapt naturally, organizations need to decide if they intend to play a role in adaptation through land management and how to play that role most effectively. This is easier said than done, of course, as land managers struggle to keep up with “traditional” challenges, not to mention the daunting complexities of climate change.

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View of the March 2018 Quarterly Harvest

Working as a collaboration to promote climate informed decisions on farms and forests. In December 2017, the USDA Northeast Climate Hub relaunched it's e-newsletter to bring readers a more visually appealing and engaging periodical. The aptly named, Quarterly Harvest, seeks to...

The Quarterly Harvest

Hertzler cows grazing in spring

How does the changing climate impact dairy operations, and what can dairy farmers do to adapt?  Increased heat stress in dairy livestock can reduce feed intake, milk production, and livestock fertility. For a Southern Pennsylvania farm, average annual losses in milk production...

Weather and Climate Considerations for Dairy

Cows on pasture laneway

A rotational stocking system controls the timing and intensity of grazing by rotating animals among paddocks, and gives the pastures time for rest and regrowth. Why should I adapt? Heavy rain events have increased dramatically in the Northeastern United States. These downpours...

Managing Grazing to Improve Climate Resilience

Rolled winter cereal cover crops provide weed suppression for organic no-till production systems.

Managing a continuous cover of plants to help improve soil health and prevent erosion. Is your field covered from the impacts? Heavy rains are becoming more frequent across the Northeastern United States and increasing soil erosion and nutrient runoff problems. Wetter weather in...

Cover Cropping to Improve Climate Resilience

agroforestry report cover

Agroforestry, the intentional integration of trees and shrubs into crop and animal production systems, is being deployed to enhance productivity, profitability, and environmental stewardship of agricultural operations and lands across the United States. This assessment provides...

Agroforestry: Enhancing resiliency in U.S. agricultural landscapes under changing conditions

Oyster Castles scene from Living Shorelines virtual tour

Smart Phone or Tablet? We suggest jumping over here for an improved virtual experience!   Sea levels are rising, and storm intensity and rainfall are projected to increase as the climate continues to warm. In 2012, Hurricane Sandy showed the state of New Jersey the power of...

Living Shorelines

Cover image to Adaptation Resources for Agricultire

Changes in climate and extreme weather are already increasing challenges for agriculture. This technical bulletin was developed specifically to meet the unique needs of agricultural producers, and provide educators and service providers in the Midwest and Northeast regions of...

Adaptation Resources for Agriculture: Responding to Climate Variability and Change in the Midwest and Northeast

Photo by Rachel Schattman

This webinar series builds on capacity within USDA to deliver science-based knowledge and practical information to farmers, ranchers, and forest landowners. Browse below for a list of archived events, and learn about upcoming, new webinars by joining our quarterly e-newsletter....

Northeast Climate Hub Webinar Series

Screenshot from Farming & Climate Change: Edgewater Farm

Extreme weather is the new normal for farming in the Northeast In this USDA Climate Hub-funded video series produced by the UVM Center for Sustainable Agriculture, hear how three successful organic farmers in Vermont, Massachusetts, and New Hampshire are adapting their farming...

Adapting to Climate Change: New England Farmers

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