Management Actions

As working lands continue to respond to the pressures of a changing climate, individuals and organizations tasked with managing these systems will benefit from reexamining their priorities, objectives, and tactics. Some land managers may ultimately decide not to make any near-term changes in priorities or tactics, even after considering climate pressures on the lands they manage. Others may choose to accommodate change even as they attempt to ensure continued value from the lands in question. In other words, as forests, rangelands, and other systems adapt naturally, organizations need to decide if they intend to play a role in adaptation through land management and how to play that role most effectively. This is easier said than done, of course, as land managers struggle to keep up with “traditional” challenges, not to mention the daunting complexities of climate change.

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Riparian forest buffers in Pennsylvania

Many people advise that while the best time to plant a tree was 20 years ago, the second best time to plant a tree is today. Winter weather makes it tough to follow this advice, but the off-season does provide a bit more time to plan ahead for the year to come. Extreme rain...

Planning for Planting

Risk of Seasonal Climate Extremes in the U.S. Related to ENSO

Selecting a type of ENSO event, temperature or precipitation and season will show the relative risk of climate extremes based on concurrent value of the ENSO index (MEI.ext) for the continental United States:

Risk of Seasonal Climate Extremes in the U.S. Related to ENSO

These improvements better enable users to explore and interpret climate-related data, and incorporate that information into their projects and landscape-level or regional planning efforts.

CONUS Climate Console

Farm worker, Ethan, brings the cows to the barn for afternoon feeding.

View Full Case Study:Clovercrest Farm: A Family Dairy in Charleston, Maine Table of Contents:A History of Clovercrest Farm »The Impacts of Climate Change on Clovercrest Farm »Adapting to the Changing Climate »Looking Ahead »Resources »      A History of Clovercrest Farm...

Clovercrest Farm: A Family Dairy in Charleston, Maine

The economic, social, and environmental costs of drought can be significant, and vulnerability to drought in arid and semi-arid regions will likely increase in the future with a warming climate. To promote stronger drought resilience on federal lands, the National Drought...

Responding to Ecological Drought in the Intermountain Region

Coproduction is a collaborative effort to produce usable or actionable science between scientists and users of science.  In practice, it is a negotiated and iterative engagement with end users and scientists that develop over time. Advantages of using coproduction: Decision...

Coproduction

The U.S. Forest Service and USDA Climate Hubs convened regional workshops in many of the nine Forest Service regions throughout 2017. The workshops helped develop a set of local strategies and tactics to reduce, mitigate, and, in some cases, recover from the effects of drought. ...

Dealing with Drought in Forests, Grasslands, and Rangelands

A changing climate is already being felt in the pocketbook. Whether these are direct, weather-related crop losses or new sources of income, weather and climate have a direct economic impact on Northeast producers. Many are looking at long- and short-term strategies to improve...

Economics of Climate Change

Cattle & Dairy Farming in the Tropics ADAPTA Climate Change Adaptation Project from the Caribbean Climate Hub Date: December 2015 | Runtime: 13:13 | Language: Spanish with English Subtitles The first video of the ADAPTA series presents Dr. Guillermo Ortiz of the...

ADAPTA | Climate Adaptation Project

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