Temperature

Since 1901, temperatures have risen in many parts of the world. Since 1970, the pace of this trend has accelerated. Increases in average global temperatures are expected to be within the range of 0.5°F to 8.6°F by 2100, with a likely increase of at least 2.7°F for all scenarios except the one representing the most aggressive mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions according to IPCC (2013). High and low temperatures are also predicted to increase, which may have negative consequences for agricultural production and forest heath. Increasing high temperatures can hurt both crop pollination and fruit development. While crop growth can continue at high daily maximum temperatures, fruit production and pollination are more sensitive. The end result may be lower yields of marketable crops, and reduced income for farmers. 

Warmer temperatures around the globe lead to stronger storms and heat waves, and more of them. Though there will likely be more average rainfall world-wide, some areas can expect to see a greater increase than others. Higher temperatures in some regions areas will intensify drought. This may increase the need for irrigation and other adaptive practices on farms.

Climate change poses both risks and opportunities for Northeast growers. A trend toward shorter, milder winters leads to longer growing seasons and potential for new crops and varieties for local markets. However, these seasonal shifts may also benefit many insect pests and be…

Studies at the Warrington Irrigation Research Farm are aimed at using water to maximize crop yields and improve profits. Water is one of the most critical crop needs. By improving water management, farmers can be sure that their crops receive adequate water throughout the…

An Economic Case Study at Intervale Community Farm After severe drought in much of the Northeast in 2016, the following summer reminded us that the trend in the Northeast is for more rainfall. However, this rain is more often occurring in heavy downpours between periods of hot…

Mid-Atlantic corn and soybean yields show great variability in response to precipitation during critical growth stages. Long-term agricultural research provides unique insights into the impact of climate and weather on agricultural sustainability. The USDA-ARS Farming Systems…

A project designed to build a virtual consortium of Masters and Doctoral students working on climate adaptation in agriculture and forestry. Nominated by a university partner within the USDA Northeast Climate Hub network, GradCAP scholars work with Climate Hub leadership,…

How are climate change and weather variability affecting Northeastern producers? Farmers, foresters, and other land owners in the Northeast are already feeling the pressures of a changing climate and increasing weather variability. In recent years the Northeast has experienced…

How does the changing climate impact dairy operations, and what can dairy farmers do to adapt?  Increased heat stress in dairy livestock can reduce feed intake, milk production, and livestock fertility. For a Southern Pennsylvania farm, average annual losses in milk production…

This report provides an overview of regional agriculture and forest sensitivities to climate change and suggests adaptation strategies that can help build resilience.  The Northeastern United States is a diverse region containing the seven most densely populated States in the…

Changes in climate and extreme weather are already increasing challenges for agriculture. This technical bulletin was developed specifically to meet the unique needs of agricultural producers, and provide educators and service providers in the Midwest and Northeast regions of…