Economics

The effects of climate change are felt throughout the entire agricultural value-chain, from individual farmers, ranchers and foresters to input suppliers, commodity transportation industry, as well as domestic and international markets for food and fiber. Economists have studied the effects of climate change on agriculture and forestry in the U.S. extensively. Economic effects vary widely by region and specific agricultural sectors, such as dairy, beef, row crops, small grains, and specialty crops. Despite the extensive research already done on the economic impacts of weather variability, extreme events, and climate change, it may still be challenging for farmers, ranchers, and foresters to find cost estimates for their specific sector and location. This highlights the importance of communicating and collaborating with your trusted local partners—such as University Extension, USDA Service Centers, and USDA Climate Hubs—who can help track down relevant economic studies. 

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Cover page to the USDA Urban Agriculture Toolkit

This toolkit lays out the common operational elements that most urban farmers must consider as they start up or grow their operations. It also contains a special section on resources for developing indoor growing operations, such as aquaponic facilities. For each element, the...

USDA Urban Agriculture Toolkit

Cover image to Adaptation Resources for Agricultire

Changes in climate and extreme weather are already increasing challenges for agriculture. This technical bulletin was developed specifically to meet the unique needs of agricultural producers, and provide educators and service providers in the Midwest and Northeast regions of...

Adaptation Resources for Agriculture: Responding to Climate Variability and Change in the Midwest and Northeast

Photo by Rachel Schattman

This webinar series builds on capacity within USDA to deliver science-based knowledge and practical information to farmers, ranchers, and forest landowners. Browse below for a list of archived events, and learn about upcoming, new webinars by joining our quarterly e-newsletter....

Northeast Climate Hub Webinar Series

Cross-Border Workshop Presentation Slide

Adaptation to Climate Change: Information and Tools for Decision-Making On October 17th and 18th, 2017 in Syracuse New York, members of the USDA Climate Hubs, Environment and Climate Change Canada, and Agriculture, Agri-Food Canada, Cornell University and Ouranos convened and...

Cross-Border Workshop

autumn road view

“Low-volume” roads are roads with traffic volumes generally less than 400 vehicles per day. Across New England these roads provide a critical transportation link for rural communities and commerce. They also provide access to forests for logging and other forest management...

The Future of Winter Roads

Farm worker, Ethan, brings the cows to the barn for afternoon feeding.

View Full Case Study:Clovercrest Farm: A Family Dairy in Charleston, Maine Table of Contents:A History of Clovercrest Farm »The Impacts of Climate Change on Clovercrest Farm »Adapting to the Changing Climate »Looking Ahead »Resources »      A History of Clovercrest Farm...

Clovercrest Farm: A Family Dairy in Charleston, Maine

The Pacific Northwest Biochar Atlas is a regional resource for biochar users and producers. Learn what biochar is, its benefits, how to make it and who is producing it. Read case studies describing benefits of using it. This resource provides guidance to farmers, gardeners, and...

Pacific Northwest Biochar Atlas

A changing climate is already being felt in the pocketbook. Whether these are direct, weather-related crop losses or new sources of income, weather and climate have a direct economic impact on Northeast producers. Many are looking at long- and short-term strategies to improve...

Economics of Climate Change

A newly constructed stream simulation culvert on the George Washington National Forest.

Extreme Precipitation and Trends There is clear evidence that precipitation in the Northeast is more intense than it was in the past. The increase in the Northeast has been greater than any other region in the U.S. (Figure 1). Between 1901 and 2014, total annual precipitation...

Storms and Stream-Crossings

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