Altered Precipitation

The amount, type, and timing of precipitation across the United States influences vegetative distribution and productivity. Changes in precipitation regimes in a changing climate, are expected to challenge land managers and producers with short- and long-term planning under greater variability and threats to working land sustainability. Likely threats include increased runoff, flooding, erosion, landslides and susceptibility to pests, decreased soil moisture and productivity, and earlier snowmelt. The USDA Climate Hubs are working with land managers to develop and implement practices to minimize the associated impacts of increasing precipitation variability.

Research at dairy farms in Vermont shows how management practices can affect water quality, economics, and greenhouse gas emissions. Agriculture is a common land use for the well-drained and productive soils of Vermont’s Winooski floodplain. Intense rain and flooding events are…

Dialing in Irrigation on Northeast Diversified Vegetable Farms Researchers and farmers work towards efficient irrigation by comparing crop water needs to weekly applications on diversified Vermont vegetable farms. View research brief » Overview Water-use efficiency…

A Study of On-Farm Decision Making in an Era of Climate Change Climate forecasts suggest farmers in the Northeast will be faced with both challenges and opportunities. Currently, farmers and other land stewards manage the risks created by changeable weather patterns in many…

An Economic Case Study at Intervale Community Farm After severe drought in much of the Northeast in 2016, the following summer reminded us that the trend in the Northeast is for more rainfall. However, this rain is more often occurring in heavy downpours between periods of hot…

Rainfall intensity is increasing in the Northeastern U.S., and stabilizing gullies is one strategy that can be used to protect against erosion. The Doyle-Burrs own a 272 acre family farm in Addison County, Vermont. The property had been a dairy farm for over 140 years, before …

The need to maintain healthy agricultural soils has never been greater as we face the challenges of climate change and feeding an expanding human population. At Cornell, sustainability is a guiding principal across campus. Education, research, and public activities all…

Mid-Atlantic corn and soybean yields show great variability in response to precipitation during critical growth stages. Long-term agricultural research provides unique insights into the impact of climate and weather on agricultural sustainability. The USDA-ARS Farming Systems…

A project designed to build a virtual consortium of Masters and Doctoral students working on climate adaptation in agriculture and forestry. Nominated by a university partner within the USDA Northeast Climate Hub network, GradCAP scholars work with Climate Hub leadership,…

How are climate change and weather variability affecting Northeastern producers? Farmers, foresters, and other land owners in the Northeast are already feeling the pressures of a changing climate and increasing weather variability. In recent years the Northeast has experienced…