Wind

Wind derives its energy from instability between regions of the globe. As the climate changes, wind patterns will change with it, impacting processes that depend on the presence or absence of wind within a specific area. Large areas in the United States are susceptible to wind erosion (e.g. coastal areas, drought-ridden and arid terrain). Wind erosivity and soil moisture content are key controls on wind erosion rates and these may be altered with climate change, along with increased drought frequency. Issues with soil erosion will depend on soil type, soil moisture level and wind direction and speed. On the other hand. Off shore and inland wind farms that depend on wind consistency to provide electricity to homes may have to adapt to changing wind patterns.

Drought Impact Reporter The National Drought Mitigation Center’s Drought Impact Reporter tracks the impact of in various ways, including scanning media for reports about drought impacts, and collecting and mapping observations of drought-related conditions and impacts from…

Changes in climate and extreme weather are already increasing challenges for agriculture. This technical bulletin was developed specifically to meet the unique needs of agricultural producers, and provide educators and service providers in the Midwest and Northeast regions of…

Understanding the risks producers face from weather and climate extremes and changes is essential to sustaining resilient agricultural systems. The wide range of cropland, grazing, and forested land management activities across the Southern Plains makes understanding these…