Pests & Disease

Weeds, insects, and diseases already have large negative impacts on our natural resources (agricultural lands/livestock, forests, recreational areas) and human health. There is mounting evidence that climate change will exacerbate these negative impacts. Ongoing increases in temperature and changes in precipitation patterns will induce new conditions that will affect insect populations, incidence of pathogens, and the geographic distribution of insects, weeds and diseases. Elevated CO2 boosts weed growth, adding to the potential for increased competition between crops and weeds. Projected increases in the frequency and severity of drought events will likely result in greater tree mortality from insects as water stress reduces a tree’s ability to defend again boring insects. Climate change is also expected to affect the geographical distribution and incidence of vector-borne diseases in the United States including increased risk of Lyme disease. Given the economic, ecological, and public health impacts of these pests, further research is needed to better understand the interactions among climate change, land-use patterns, and pest impacts and how best to mitigate the negative impacts.

The Reforestation Dialogues and Symposium, a two-day event held in November 2018 organized by U.S. Forest Service Region 5 and the USDA California Climate Hub, was designed to promote co-concept generation and co-production around the current challenges and opportunities related…

How are climate change and weather variability affecting Northeastern producers? Farmers, foresters, and other land owners in the Northeast are already feeling the pressures of a changing climate and increasing weather variability. In recent years the Northeast has experienced…

This growing network of climate-informed demonstration sites is designed to take you to the field and make you feel 'As If You Were There.' Field tours are a powerful teacher because they are an ideal way to see how farm and forestry practices work in the real world. Consider…