Impact Assessment

Climate change impact assessments are used to discover how future changes in atmospheric CO2, temperature, precipitation, and other climatic variables will negatively (or positively) affect the natural environment, agriculture, energy, land and water resources, transportation, human health and welfare, human social systems, and biological diversity. Impact assessments may be conducted at any scale (local-regional-national-international) and may draw upon qualitative synthesis of existing research, or use quantitative model-based analysis. Impact assessments enable managers, decision makers, researchers and stakeholders to begin the process of considering potential responses to climate change impacts. Impact assessments do not explore capacity to adapt in detail (see Vulnerability Assessments). 

Specialty crops are an important component of the Midwest region’s rural economy with an estimated value of $1.8 billion (estimate from 2012). They are generally more sensitive to climatic stressors and require more comprehensive management compared to traditional row crops.…

The economic, social, and environmental costs of drought can be significant. To promote stronger drought resilience on federal lands, the National Drought Resilience Partnership was initiated in 2016. As a part of this effort, the U.S. Forest Service conducted a series of…

The National Drought Resilience Partnership is an effort to promote stronger drought resilience on federal lands. As a part of this effort, the U.S. Forest Service conducted a series of focused workshops across the country to understand the management opportunities and…

The economic, social, and environmental costs of drought can be significant, and vulnerability to drought in arid and semi-arid regions will likely increase in the future with a warming climate. To promote stronger drought resilience on federal lands, the National Drought…

Alaska is at the forefront of experiencing the effects of climate change as it has warmed twice as fast as the contiguous US. Sea ice, glaciers and permafrost are melting, spring snowmelt is occurring earlier, river ice break-up is happening earlier; all of this affects local…

The climate in the Northeast U.S. has been changing. Winters have been getting warmer and heavy rainstorms are becoming much more common.  Many longtime farmers feel that the seasons have shifted, and the latest climate models indicate that these changes are likely to…

Understanding the risks producers face from weather and climate extremes and changes is essential to sustaining resilient agricultural systems. The wide range of cropland, grazing, and forested land management activities across the Southern Plains makes understanding these…