Climate Science

Climate refers to the average meteorological conditions and patterns in a region over a long time period. These meteorological conditions include measurements such as temperature, precipitation, and wind. In other words, climate can be described as the 'average weather'. Although weather can change rapidly from day to day and can be difficult to predict, climate is much more predictable. For example, the weather where we live dictates what we wear each day, which can change dramatically from one day to the next. However, the climate influences the type of clothes we have in our closet, which is generally consistent from year to year (CCRC).

Climate science investigates the earth’s climate, incorporating many disciplines including meteorology, oceanography, physics, chemistry, ecosystem sciences, and more.

Text from the USDA Forest Service Climate Change Resource Center (CCRC)

The Environmental Law & Policy Center, in concert with the Chicago Council on Global Affairs, commissioned the following scientists and experts to produce this report to educate policymakers and the public about the significant changes affecting the Great Lakes, and the…

Engaging the Integrated Erosion Tool (IET) to define Soil Conditioning Index (SCI), understand impacts of climate on modeled cropping systems plus improve farmer profitability  The 2019 Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) Liaison, Justin Mount, is working with the…

Specialty crops are an important component of the Midwest region’s rural economy with an estimated value of $1.8 billion (estimate from 2012). They are generally more sensitive to climatic stressors and require more comprehensive management compared to traditional row crops.…

The following Symposium will take place at the National Adaptation Forum on Tuesday, April 23rd from 1100-1230.   Improving Decision-Making Through Regional Collaboration Success in obtaining resilient and sustainable agroecosystems within the Midwest Region can only be…

The Midwest Climate Hub coordinates the Midwest Agriculture Climate Team, or MAC-T (pronounced MACK-tee). MAC-T began in the spring of 2017 when a warm, late winter induced early dormancy break in the Midwest Region. Freezing conditions were still likely to take place, creating …

Drought Impact Reporter The National Drought Mitigation Center’s Drought Impact Reporter tracks the impact of in various ways, including scanning media for reports about drought impacts, and collecting and mapping observations of drought-related conditions and impacts from…

A project designed to build a virtual consortium of Masters and Doctoral students working on climate adaptation in agriculture and forestry. Nominated by a university partner within the USDA Northeast Climate Hub network, GradCAP scholars work with Climate Hub leadership,…

How are climate change and weather variability affecting Northeastern producers? Farmers, foresters, and other land owners in the Northeast are already feeling the pressures of a changing climate and increasing weather variability. In recent years the Northeast has experienced…

This report provides an overview of regional agriculture and forest sensitivities to climate change and suggests adaptation strategies that can help build resilience.  The Northeastern United States is a diverse region containing the seven most densely populated States in the…