Soil

Soils provide a wide variety of ecosystem services, including regulating carbon through sequestration and providing a structure to support crop plants. Erosion of soil, the primary source for soil particles to leave agricultural fields, may increase in certain areas of the U.S. due to climate change. Some areas of the country will experience less rainfall, causing soils to dry out. Combined with higher winds, this may lead to higher rates of wind erosion. Other areas may experience more intensive rainstorms, which can increase erosion rates by washing out stream banks, for example. Other factors affecting soil erosion that may increase or decrease due to climate change include changing irrigation needs, snowmelt patterns, soil erodibility, conservation practices, and topography.

Soil Health and Climate Change Agricultural professionals in the Northwest are and will continue to be impacted by climate change in a multitude of ways. Climate change is expected to increase the vulnerability of our agriculture systems, challenging managers’ ability to adopt…

Capstone students are helping us hear the stories of farmers who are adapting to climate change The Public Communication Capstone is a service-learning course at the University of Vermont (UVM). The USDA Northeast Climate Hub partnered with a team of Capstone students in Spring…

Engaging the Integrated Erosion Tool (IET) to define Soil Conditioning Index (SCI), understand impacts of climate on modeled cropping systems plus improve farmer profitability  The 2019 Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) Liaison, Justin Mount, is working with the…

Lessons Learned from the Urban Forestry Climate Change Response Framework Project: Chicago Wilderness Overview Urban areas are already experiencing impacts of a changing climate including increased temperatures, flooding, and extreme storms. These impacts are projected to…

Dialing in Irrigation on Northeast Diversified Vegetable Farms Researchers and farmers work towards efficient irrigation by comparing crop water needs to weekly applications on diversified Vermont vegetable farms. View research brief » Overview Water-use efficiency is an…

Studies at the Warrington Irrigation Research Farm are aimed at using water to maximize crop yields and improve profits. Water is one of the most critical crop needs. By improving water management, farmers can be sure that their crops receive adequate water throughout the…

Sustainable Agriculture and Research for Understanding, or SARE, has released the following resource: Cultivating Climate Resilience on Farms and Ranches. This document outlines the new challenges that changing weather patterns pose in agriculture throughout the United…

Rainfall intensity is increasing in the Northeastern U.S., and stabilizing gullies is one strategy that can be used to protect against erosion. The Doyle-Burrs own a 272 acre family farm in Addison County, Vermont. The property had been a dairy farm for over 140 years, before …