Livestock

In general, livestock such as poultry and swine are managed in housed, temperature controlled systems. Adjusting these systems to adapt to outside temperature changes may mitigate some of the negative impacts of climate change. However, despite current technologies to manage livestock temperatures, high summer temperatures sill cost swine producers over $300 million every year. As livestock producers adapt to climate change, management and energy costs associated with increased temperature regulation will likely increase. In the future, producers may consider selecting breeds and breed types that are genetically adapted to changed climate conditions.

Cows on pasture at Shelburne Farms in Vermont

The climate in the Northeast U.S. has been changing. Winters have been getting warmer and heavy rainstorms are becoming much more common.  Many longtime farmers feel that the seasons have shifted, and the latest climate models indicate that these changes are likely to continue....

Agricultural Vulnerabilities in the Northeast

cattle-pasture

Climate Impacts Livestock operations are sensitive to climate change and variability. Heat stress reduces dairy and livestock production, with decreases in yields as great as 10% projected for the southeastern region. Climate changes impact the quality of feed and pasture...

Focus on Livestock in the Southeast

Overview of climate change impacts on animal agriculture in the Southwestern United States Animal agriculture accounts for one-third of the agricultural revenue in the Southwest.  In 2012, the market value of livestock and poultry for the six-state region was $17.6 billion....

Focus on Livestock in the Southwest

The Midwestern states (Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Ohio, and Wisconsin) are often called the “Corn Belt”. However, this region offers a diversity of agricultural production beyond corn and soybean. The Midwest represents one of the most intense areas...

Agriculture in the Midwest

Subscribe to Livestock