Livestock

In general, livestock such as poultry and swine are managed in housed, temperature controlled systems. Adjusting these systems to adapt to outside temperature changes may mitigate some of the negative impacts of climate change. However, despite current technologies to manage livestock temperatures, high summer temperatures sill cost swine producers over $300 million every year. As livestock producers adapt to climate change, management and energy costs associated with increased temperature regulation will likely increase. In the future, producers may consider selecting breeds and breed types that are genetically adapted to changed climate conditions.

Rangelands in shrub steppe of the Inland Northwest support livestock via a wide diversity of plant species. Locally, large amounts of bare ground contribute to the relative fragility of rangeland ecosystems, making them especially sensitive due to local rainfall events, drought...

Northwest Rangelands, Weather and Climate

Local weather and climate determine the commodities produced and affect growth, disease, and soil health. Understanding current weather and climate is important for producing crops sustainabily. The Northwest Climate Hub works to support use of current and projected information...

Northwest Agriculture, Weather and Climate

Crimson clover cover crop

A changing climate introduces challenges for producers in the Northwest. The following resources can help farmers adjust their practices or even transform their operations to meet these challenges: AgBiz Logic and AgBiz Logic Climate AgBiz Logic uniquely collects, manages and...

Climate Adaptation Resources for Northwest Agriculture

An incised stream occurs when a stream cuts its channel into the bed of a valley through degradation (erosion). As a stream cuts its channel the water table drops and the surrounding vegetation changes from wetlands and meadows to dry shrublands. Incised streams are thought to...

Incised Stream Restoration in the Western U.S.

Climate Effects on Livestock and Dairy Heat stress increases animal body temperatures, sweating, and panting, and thus reduces animal feed intake and productivity In dairy cows, heat stress reduces: the amount of milk produced, milk fat and protein content, and fertility rates....

Focus on Livestock in the Caribbean

California has a large and diverse livestock industry: it is the number one dairy state in the nation and is also a leading producer of beef cattle, broiler chickens, eggs, turkey, sheep, and goats. Climate adaptation is a major concern for livestock producers: intensive...

Focus on Livestock in California

Cows on pasture at Shelburne Farms in Vermont

The climate in the Northeast U.S. has been changing. Winters have been getting warmer and heavy rainstorms are becoming much more common.  Many longtime farmers feel that the seasons have shifted, and the latest climate models indicate that these changes are likely to continue....

Agricultural Vulnerabilities in the Northeast

cattle-pasture

Climate Impacts Livestock operations are sensitive to climate change and variability. Heat stress reduces dairy and livestock production, with decreases in yields as great as 10% projected for the southeastern region. Climate changes impact the quality of feed and pasture...

Focus on Livestock in the Southeast

Overview of climate change impacts on animal agriculture in the Southwestern United States Animal agriculture accounts for one-third of the agricultural revenue in the Southwest.  In 2012, the market value of livestock and poultry for the six-state region was $17.6 billion....

Focus on Livestock in the Southwest

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