Livestock

In general, livestock such as poultry and swine are managed in housed, temperature controlled systems. Adjusting these systems to adapt to outside temperature changes may mitigate some of the negative impacts of climate change. However, despite current technologies to manage livestock temperatures, high summer temperatures sill cost swine producers over $300 million every year. As livestock producers adapt to climate change, management and energy costs associated with increased temperature regulation will likely increase. In the future, producers may consider selecting breeds and breed types that are genetically adapted to changed climate conditions.

09/19/17 Flexible Stocking Summit Report The Flexible Stocking Summit brought ranchers together from eastern Wyoming and Colorado, alongside USDA researchers and University Extension professionals. The summit was held at the Semiarid Grasslands Research Center near Nunn, CO, on…

Researchers in the Northern Plains have been studying how changes in the atmosphere might impact rangelands throughout the region. With this research under our belt, we can begin strategizing how to adapt our rangeland and grazing management practices to future conditions. The…

The following content is from a publication from the Forest Service Office of Sustainability and Climate, the full content can be viewed/downloaded in PDF Drought Effects Droughts can result in reduced growth rates, defoliation, and increased stress on vegetation, with…

A rotational stocking system controls the timing and intensity of grazing by rotating animals among paddocks, and gives the pastures time for rest and regrowth. Heavy rain events have increased dramatically in the Northeastern United States. These downpours are causing more…

Changes in climate and extreme weather are already increasing challenges for agriculture. This technical bulletin was developed specifically to meet the unique needs of agricultural producers, and provide educators and service providers in the Midwest and Northeast regions of…

This webinar series builds on capacity within USDA to deliver science-based knowledge and practical information to farmers, ranchers, and forest landowners. Browse below for a list of archived events, and learn about upcoming, new webinars by joining our e-newsletter, The…

A changing climate introduces challenges for ranchers and natural resource managers. The following resources are designed to help them adjust their practices or even transform their operations: Adaptation Partners Adaptation Partners is a science-management partnership focused…

Farmers in the Northeast are exploring options to adapt to the changing climate. Higher average temperatures and more intense rains impact farms and can take a toll on livestock. Intensive rotational grazing, silvopasture, and cow houses are practices that can increase…

Angus Glen Farms practice a type of agroforestry known as silvopasture. This practice is a blend of the sustainable production of livestock, forage, and trees on the same land. Maintaining both farm and forest while managing water and nutrients increases long-term income and…