Crops

The effects of climate change on crop production will vary by region, and will largely be a factor of impacts on resources important to agricultural production, such as soil and water.

Soils provide a wide variety of ecosystem services, including regulating carbon through sequestration and providing a structure to support crop plants. Erosion of soil, the primary source for soil particles to leave agricultural fields, may increase in certain areas of the U.S. due to climate change. Some areas of the country will experience less rainfall, causing soils to dry out. Combined with higher winds, this may lead to higher rates of wind erosion. Other areas may experience more intensive rainstorms, which can increase erosion rates by washing out stream banks, for example. Other factors affecting soil erosion that may increase or decrease due to climate change include changing irrigation needs, snowmelt patterns, soil erodibility, conservation practices, and topography.

Continue to the full text Croplands in a Changing Climate or browse related content:

The Northeast region of the United States is home to a tremendous array of edible crop production including all except sub-tropical species.  The region has a wide variety of climate zones, soil types, and accessible, large markets, and has a long history of terminal markets...

Specialty Crop Production in a Constantly Changing Climate

In conversation with Nelson Cecarelli, Owner of Cecarelli Farms on June 5th, 2017 Well before the installation of a RainWise MKIII weather station at Cecarelli Farms this past January, Nelson Cecarelli was itching to harness the power of his own on-farm data. The year prior,...

Cecarelli Farms Talks Data Driven Decision-Making

Within the United States, biofuels are generally divided into ethanol and biodiesel, and are as an additive or replacement for transportation fuels traditionally provided by petroleum, including gasoline and diesel. Ethanol and biodiesel can be produced corn, soybeans, or other...

Biofuel

Bioenergy is renewable energy derived from biological sources, to be used for heat, electricity, or vehicle fuel. Biofuel derived from plant materials is among the most rapidly growing renewable energy technologies. Conversion of biomass to liquid fuel is a method utilizing...

Bioenergy in a Changing Climate

UVM research team

Consider the experiences of others who are adapting to a changing climate. This new and growing network of climate-informed demonstration sites is designed to take you to the field and make you feel 'As If You Were There.' Field tours are a powerful teacher becasue they are an...

'As If You Were There' | 360° Demonstrations

The ACFP toolbox contains tools to: Process (or “hydro-condition”) a watershed’s high-resolution topographic data for terrain analyses Determine which fields within a watershed are most prone to contribute runoff to streams Identify where field-scale and edge-of-...

Agricultural Conservation Planning Framework (ACPF)

The changing climate presents challenges and opportunities for U.S. agricultural production, forest resources, and rural economies. These threats have significant implications not just for farmers, ranchers, and forest landowners, but for all Americans. Land managers across the...

Growing Seasons in a Changing Climate

Data/Data visualization Climate mapper: visualization of current, historical, and future projections of climate data relevant to agriculture Drought Monitoring System-University of Washington: total moisture, soil moisture and snow water equivalent data visualization...

Northwest Agriculture Research and Data Overview

Delaware State University's Tunnel Houses

Smart Phone or Tablet? We suggest jumping over here for an improved virtual experience!   High tunnels help small farmers protect and improve their operations by serving as a shelter from sun, pests and intense rain events. Farmers are adapting as average temperatures increase...

High Tunnels at DSU

Subscribe to Crops