Disturbances

Disturbances and stressors are often thought as one in the same and while they can have similar effects to agriculture production to rangeland and forest resources there are important differences worth considering.  It is important to note these differences because it may change the management approach or practice being considered when dealing with a disturbance event like a flood or persistent stressor such as nitrogen deposition. 

Examples of ecological disturbances include fires, landslides, flooding, windstorms and insect and pest outbreaks.  Disturbances often come in the form of short-term or temporary changes to the landscape but can have very significant ecosystem impacts. These events often act quickly but with great impact and thereby are able to promote changes to the physical structure of the system. 

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For the most up to date newsletters, research publications and events, check out the Midwest Climate Hub Additional Resources page. Access to the Midwest Climate Hub archives and additional Tools can be found here as well. Midwest CHU The Midwest CHU (Climate Hub Update)...

Additional Resources and Tools

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