Climate Science 101

What is Climate?

Climate refers to the average meteorological conditions and patterns in a region over a long time period. These meteorological conditions include measurements such as temperature, precipitation, and wind. In other words, climate can be described as the 'average weather'. Although weather can change rapidly from day to day and can be difficult to predict, climate is much more predictable. For example, the weather where we live dictates what we wear each day, which can change dramatically from one day to the next. However, the climate influences the type of clothes we have in our closet, which is generally consistent from year to year.

Text from the USDA Forest Service Climate Change Resource Center (CCRC)

 

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