Water Management

Farmers, ranchers and foresters in some regions of the U.S. contend with an overabundance of water while other regions are frequently challenged by drought and water scarcity. The 100th meridian is often touted as the dividing line between the wet eastern United States and the dry, water-limited west. Projected changes in average annual precipitation show increases in much of the northern U.S. and decreases in the southern U.S., exacerbating the water-related challenges already faced in these areas. For example, an increase in spring precipitation may reduce the number of workable field days, reduce crop yields and disrupt planting operations in wetter regions. Extreme precipitation has generally increased and is projected to continue to increase across the U.S. with a warming atmosphere. Flooding related to more extreme precipitation could impact agricultural production and surface water quality as nutrient concentrations and sediment loads are washed from fields into nearby waterways.  More extreme precipitation could also increase climate risk from aging water infrastructure.

Cover image to Adaptation Resources for Agricultire

Changes in climate and extreme weather are already increasing challenges for agriculture. This technical bulletin was developed specifically to meet the unique needs of agricultural producers, and provide educators and service providers in the Midwest and Northeast regions of...

Adaptation Resources for Agriculture: Responding to Climate Variability and Change in the Midwest and Northeast

Photo by Rachel Schattman

This webinar series builds on capacity within USDA to deliver science-based knowledge and practical information to farmers, ranchers, and forest landowners. Browse below for a list of archived events, and learn about upcoming, new webinars by joining our quarterly e-newsletter....

Northeast Climate Hub Webinar Series

Screenshot from Farming & Climate Change: Edgewater Farm

Extreme weather is the new normal for farming in the Northeast In this USDA Climate Hub-funded video series produced by the UVM Center for Sustainable Agriculture, hear how three successful organic farmers in Vermont, Massachusetts, and New Hampshire are adapting their farming...

Adapting to Climate Change: New England Farmers

This field guide is designed to put useful climate change and adaptation information into the hands of natural resource professionals as they walk through the woods. This field guide provides summary information about the effects of climate change on northern Minnesota’s forests...

Climate Change Field Guide for Northern Minnesota Forests: Site-level considerations and adaptation

Oyster catchers in Glacier Bay

Alaska has warmed more than twice as rapidly as the rest of the United States. Water drives ecosystems and livelihoods in Alaska, and the resulting changes in snow, ice, and water have costs to natural resources and ways of life. These changes will continue for the foreseeable...

Changing water dynamics in Alaska

Drought has economic, social, cultural, and ecological costs and in the Pacific Northwest droughts are expected to occur more often and for prolonged periods due to changes in climate. As drought becomes more prevalent changes to natural resources are expected. To promote...

Drought impacts and management options in the Pacific Northwest

A changing climate is already being felt in the pocketbook. Whether these are direct, weather-related crop losses or new sources of income, weather and climate have a direct economic impact on Northeast producers. Many are looking at long- and short-term strategies to improve...

Economics of Climate Change

A newly constructed stream simulation culvert on the George Washington National Forest.

Extreme Precipitation and Trends There is clear evidence that precipitation in the Northeast is more intense than it was in the past. The increase in the Northeast has been greater than any other region in the U.S. (Figure 1). Between 1901 and 2014, total annual precipitation...

Storms and Stream-Crossings

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