Forests & Woodlands

The climate changes expected over the next century will have huge consequences for ecosystems and the benefits they provide, including the provision of wood and fuel, food, temperature and flood regulation, erosion control, recreational and aesthetic value, and species habitat, among others.

Climate changes are likely to affect important ecological processes that will, in turn, affect key natural resources. For example, temperature and precipitation changes could mean that insectswildfireinvasive plants, and forest diseases will become more frequent in some areas of the country. The emissions that cause climate change also lead to air quality problems that put additional stress on trees.

 

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Caroline Lake, Wisconsin

Project partners identified a number of potential adaptation actions with the overarching intent to maintain the resilience of the forest to changing conditions. In the northern hardwood forest, actions to maintain and enhance tree species diversity were prescribed to reduce the...

The Nature Conservancy: Caroline Lake Preserve

Sorting seeds to be planted in oak wilt treatment areas

Expansive forests of large maple, oak, and birch trees are prized across the Northwoods for many reasons, including their beauty, their diversity, and their ability to provide valuable wood. Unfortunately, forests pests and disease pose increasingly large threats for these and...

Responding to Oak Wilt on the Menominee Forest

USDA Forest Service Climate Change Resource Center

The CCRC addresses the land manager's question "What can I do about climate change?" The CCRC provides information about climate change impacts on forests and other ecosystems, and approaches to adaptation and mitigation in forests and grasslands. The website...

USDA Forest Service Climate Change Resource Center

USDA Forest Service Climate Change Resource Center - Ed. Modules

Provide an in-depth introduction to basic climate change science, the effects of climate change on forest and grassland ecosystems, and how we can respond to climate change with management.

Education Modules

Climate Change Response Framework (Forestadaptation.org)

The Climate Change Response Framework is a collaborative, cross-boundary approach among scientists, managers, and landowners to incorporate climate change considerations into natural resource management. It provides an integrated set of tools, partnerships, and actions to...

NIACS Climate Change Response Framework

Ecosystem services are the direct and indirect benefits that ecosystems provide humans. Agroecosystems, rangelands, and forests provide suites of ecosystem services that support and sustain human livelihoods. These services are typically broken down into four categories:...

Ecosystem Services

Red oak tree leafing out in spring

The visualization tool provides an online map-based interface for USA National Phenology Network data observations collected across the United States. Users can explore recent trends for species seasonal changes or phenophases (e.g., flowering, hatching), as they relate to...

USA National Phenology Network Visualization Tool

Neighborhood trees line a city street

i-Tree consists of several different applications focused on quantifying the benefits of local trees for neighborhoods and communities. Each application has a unique focus, however several calculate the carbon sequestration and/or energy savings benefits of urban trees.

i-Tree

Map of current white oak distribution from Tree Atlas

The Climate Change Atlas can be used to examine the current distribution of tree and bird habitats in the eastern United States, and how these habitat distributions might change in response to different climate scenarios. The Atlas was created using a model called DISTRIB that...

Climate Change Tree Atlas & Bird Atlas

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