Forests & Woodlands

The climate changes expected over the next century will have huge consequences for ecosystems and the benefits they provide, including the provision of wood and fuel, food, temperature and flood regulation, erosion control, recreational and aesthetic value, and species habitat, among others.

Climate changes are likely to affect important ecological processes that will, in turn, affect key natural resources. For example, temperature and precipitation changes could mean that insectswildfireinvasive plants, and forest diseases will become more frequent in some areas of the country. The emissions that cause climate change also lead to air quality problems that put additional stress on trees.

 

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Tree mortality across the Musick Creek and Bald Mountain landscapes on the Sierra National Forest, High Sierra Ranger District

Webinar Summary In April 2017, the U.S. Forest Service Office of Sustainability and Climate hosted a webinar focused on drought and forest ecosystems. Scientists discussed how the ecological effects of drought and a changing climate interact with those of wildfire, insects,...

Drought and Forest Ecosystems

Climate change impacts to Wisconsin freshwater fish storymap

To explore how fish communities in Wisconsin lakes are expected to change in the future, and examine predictions for individual lakes throughout Wisconsin with an interactive map. This tool is relevant to lakeshed and community managers considering the future of recreation and...

Climate change impacts to Wisconsin freshwater fish

To convey information contained in the Forest Ecosystem Vulnerability Assessment and Synthesis for New England and Northern New York forests.

Storymap of Climate Change and Adaptation: New England

This field guide is designed to put useful climate change and adaptation information into the hands of natural resource professionals as they walk through the woods. This field guide provides summary information about the effects of climate change on northern Minnesota’s forests...

Climate Change Field Guide for Northern Minnesota Forests: Site-level considerations and adaptation

Piñyon decline in the Lincoln National Forest due to drought and insect infestations

The National Drought Resilience Partnership is an effort to promote stronger drought resilience on federal lands. As a part of this effort, the U.S. Forest Service conducted a series of focused workshops across the country to understand the management opportunities and...

Drought Impacts in the Southwestern Region

The economic, social, and environmental costs of drought can be significant, and vulnerability to drought in arid and semi-arid regions will likely increase in the future with a warming climate. To promote stronger drought resilience on federal lands, the National Drought...

Responding to Ecological Drought in the Intermountain Region

A newly constructed stream simulation culvert on the George Washington National Forest.

Extreme Precipitation and Trends There is clear evidence that precipitation in the Northeast is more intense than it was in the past. The increase in the Northeast has been greater than any other region in the U.S. (Figure 1). Between 1901 and 2014, total annual precipitation...

Storms and Stream-Crossings

Stand of birch trees in the northwoods

Climate trends in northern Minnesota point to a future that will be warmer and more variable, presenting greater stress for boreal species such as paper birch, white spruce, and balsam fir. Early public feedback on the proposed North Shore Forest Restoration Project indicated...

Superior National Forest: North Shore Forest Restoration Project

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