Forest & Woodland Management

The climate changes expected over the next century will have huge consequences for ecosystems and the benefits they provide, including the provision of wood and fuel, food, temperature and flood regulation, erosion control, recreational and aesthetic value, and species habitat, among others.

Climate changes are likely to affect important ecological processes that will, in turn, affect key natural resources. For example, temperature and precipitation changes could mean that insectswildfireinvasive plants, and forest diseases will become more frequent in some areas of the country. The emissions that cause climate change also lead to air quality problems that put additional stress on trees.

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Oyster catchers in Glacier Bay

Alaska has warmed more than twice as rapidly as the rest of the United States. Water drives ecosystems and livelihoods in Alaska, and the resulting changes in snow, ice, and water have costs to natural resources and ways of life. These changes will continue for the foreseeable...

Changing water dynamics in Alaska

Drought has economic, social, cultural, and ecological costs and in the Pacific Northwest droughts are expected to occur more often and for prolonged periods due to changes in climate. As drought becomes more prevalent changes to natural resources are expected. To promote...

Drought impacts and management options in the Pacific Northwest

From a Dec. 8, 2017, International Space Station flyover of Southern California, NASA astronaut Randy Bresnik photographed the plumes of smoke rising from wildfires

CALFIRE-statewide map of California fires.  By following the link on the CAL FIRE home page one can obtain up-to-date and useful  information related to specific incidents in the state – information includes approximate wildfire locations, road closures, general precautionary...

California Wildfires Information

Drought is a natural and recurring feature of climate, which can have significant economic, social, and environmental impacts. Some regions are projected to experience drought more often in the future under a changing climate. To promote stronger drought resilience on federal...

Responding to Ecological Drought in the Northern and Rocky Mountain Regions

The economic, social, and environmental costs of drought can be significant, and vulnerability to drought in arid and semi-arid regions will likely increase in the future with a warming climate. To promote stronger drought resilience on federal lands, the National Drought...

Responding to Ecological Drought in the Intermountain Region

A newly constructed stream simulation culvert on the George Washington National Forest.

Extreme Precipitation and Trends There is clear evidence that precipitation in the Northeast is more intense than it was in the past. The increase in the Northeast has been greater than any other region in the U.S. (Figure 1). Between 1901 and 2014, total annual precipitation...

Storms and Stream-Crossings

Stand of birch trees in the northwoods

Climate trends in northern Minnesota point to a future that will be warmer and more variable, presenting greater stress for boreal species such as paper birch, white spruce, and balsam fir. Early public feedback on the proposed North Shore Forest Restoration Project indicated...

Superior National Forest: North Shore Forest Restoration Project

Caroline Lake, Wisconsin

Project partners identified a number of potential adaptation actions with the overarching intent to maintain the resilience of the forest to changing conditions. In the northern hardwood forest, actions to maintain and enhance tree species diversity were prescribed to reduce the...

The Nature Conservancy: Caroline Lake Preserve

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