Forest & Woodland Management

The climate changes expected over the next century will have huge consequences for ecosystems and the benefits they provide, including the provision of wood and fuel, food, temperature and flood regulation, erosion control, recreational and aesthetic value, and species habitat, among others.

Climate changes are likely to affect important ecological processes that will, in turn, affect key natural resources. For example, temperature and precipitation changes could mean that insectswildfireinvasive plants, and forest diseases will become more frequent in some areas of the country. The emissions that cause climate change also lead to air quality problems that put additional stress on trees.

Continue to the full text Forests in a Changing Climate or browse related content:

National Interagency Fire Center and InciWeb The National Interagency Fire Center and InciWeb posts fire information for large scale fires in the US. As of 9 July 2018 throughout the US there have been over 3.2 million wildland acres burned in large fires which is over a half a...

Fire information for the Northwest

References for Climate Risk Management Practices prepared by: J.J. Ho; J.E. Halofsky; D.L. Peterson.    References U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service [USDA FS]. 2008. Forest Service strategic framework for responding to climate change. Version 1.0. Washington, DC: U....

Climate Risk Management Practices: References

Climate change is a major challenge in natural resource management, both because of the magnitude of potential effects and because of the uncertainty associated with climate change projections and effects. Adapting resource management to changing conditions is critical to reduce...

Climate Risk Management Practices

Sensitivities A. Increased flood frequency and higher peak flows may reduce egg-fry survival for fall spawners and yearling parr winter survival. B. Increased sedimentation in streams will accompany increased flooding and wildfire. C. Lower low flows in summer will reduce fish...

Climate Risk Management Practices: Fish Habitat and Fisheries

Burned riparian area

Sensitivity A. Reduced snowpack, shifts in hydrologic regime involving changes in timing and magnitude of streamflows, and changing groundwater recharge and discharge will likely lead to shifts in plant species composition and reduced habitat quality in riparian areas, wetlands...

Climate Risk Management Practices: Riparian Areas, Wetlands, and Groundwater-Dependent Ecosystems

Sensitivities A. There will be increased opportunity for invasive species establishment with increased disturbance and shifting plant species composition under changing climate. B. Climate change may lead to loss of climatically suitable habitat for persistent pinyon-juniper...

Climate Risk Management Practices: Non-Forest Vegetation

Ponderosa pine

Sensitivities A. Warming temperatures will lead to longer fire seasons, increased wildfire frequency, and increased area burned across the western U.S. B. There will be increased opportunity for invasive species establishment with increased disturbance and shifting plant species...

Climate Risk Management Practices: Forest Vegetation

To convey information contained in the Forest Ecosystem Vulnerability Assessment and Synthesis for New England and Northern New York forests.

Storymap of Climate Change and Adaptation: New England

This field guide is designed to put useful climate change and adaptation information into the hands of natural resource professionals as they walk through the woods. This field guide provides summary information about the effects of climate change on northern Minnesota’s forests...

Climate Change Field Guide for Northern Minnesota Forests: Site-level considerations and adaptation

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