Animal Health

Climate change can increase the chances that exotic animal and plant diseases, invasive species, and agricultural pests are introduced and spread throughout the United States— potentially elevating risks to our Nation’s food security and human health. USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) conducts in‐depth analyses and planning to anticipate these changes and how they may affect its programs, policies, and regulations designed to protect plant and animal health. (Source: APHIS Factsheet)

An image describing the components used to build Grass-Cast.

Every spring, ranchers face the same difficult challenge – trying to guess how much grass will be available for livestock to graze during the upcoming summer. An innovative Grassland Productivity Forecast or Grass-Cast published its first forecast on May 22, 2018 to help...

Grass-Cast: Grassland Productivity Forecast

Photo by Matt Mortenson. Steers drinking out of water trough.

09/19/17 Flexible Stocking Summit Report The Flexible Stocking Summit brought ranchers together from eastern Wyoming and Colorado, alongside USDA researchers and University Extension professionals. The summit was held at the Semiarid Grasslands Research Center near Nunn, CO, on...

Flexible Stocking Summit Report: A Peer-to-Peer Discussion and Learning Event

Research Study Site: USDA-ARS High Plains Grasslands Research Station

Researchers in the Northern Plains have been studying how changes in the atmosphere might impact rangelands throughout the region. With this research under our belt, we can begin strategizing how to adapt our rangeland and grazing management practices to future conditions. The...

Adapting for the Future

Hertzler cows grazing in spring

How does the changing climate impact dairy operations, and what can dairy farmers do to adapt?  Increased heat stress in dairy livestock can reduce feed intake, milk production, and livestock fertility. For a Southern Pennsylvania farm, average annual losses in milk production...

Weather and Climate Considerations for Dairy

Cows on pasture laneway

A rotational stocking system controls the timing and intensity of grazing by rotating animals among paddocks, and gives the pastures time for rest and regrowth. Why should I adapt? Heavy rain events have increased dramatically in the Northeastern United States. These downpours...

Managing Grazing to Improve Climate Resilience

Cover image to Adaptation Resources for Agricultire

Changes in climate and extreme weather are already increasing challenges for agriculture. This technical bulletin was developed specifically to meet the unique needs of agricultural producers, and provide educators and service providers in the Midwest and Northeast regions of...

Adaptation Resources for Agriculture: Responding to Climate Variability and Change in the Midwest and Northeast

Photo by Rachel Schattman

This webinar series builds on capacity within USDA to deliver science-based knowledge and practical information to farmers, ranchers, and forest landowners. Browse below for a list of archived events, and learn about upcoming, new webinars by joining our quarterly e-newsletter....

Northeast Climate Hub Webinar Series

Farm worker, Ethan, brings the cows to the barn for afternoon feeding.

View Full Case Study:Clovercrest Farm: A Family Dairy in Charleston, Maine Table of Contents:A History of Clovercrest Farm »The Impacts of Climate Change on Clovercrest Farm »Adapting to the Changing Climate »Looking Ahead »Resources »      A History of Clovercrest Farm...

Clovercrest Farm: A Family Dairy in Charleston, Maine

chs-email-alert

Subscribe to the alert with your area of interest. The Southeast Regional Climate Hub (SERCH) monitors the ARS cattle heat stress dataset for changes at your area of interest. We send you a summary email notification of any changes.

SERCH LIGHTS Cattle Heat Stress Alert

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